The A-Z of Fabrics!

We thought it would be fun to make a list of the fabric alphabet…so here it is!

Acetate A manufactured fiber formed by compound of cellulose, refined from cotton linters and/or wood pulp, and acedic acid that has been extruded through a spinneret and then hardened.

Basket Weave A distinctive technique of weaving that creates a fabric resembling basket work with interwoven fibers. Basketweave fabric is most common in home décor fabrics.

Canvas A strong, durable, closely woven cotton fabric.

Damask A glossy jacquard-type fabric, the patterns are flat and reversible. Unlike jacquards, the fabric is all one color. Suitable for draperies, curtains bed and table linens.

Eyelet Fabric with patterned cut-outs, around which stitching or embroidery may be applied in order to prevent the fabric from raveling.

Flannel Usually a 100% cotton fabric that has been brushed on one or both sides for softness. Typically used for shirts and sleepwear.

Gabardine A worsted twill weave that is wrinkle resistant. Wool gabardine is the most common and is considered year-round fabric for suits.

Herringbone A variation on the twill weave construction in which the twill is reversed, or broken, at regular intervals, producing a zig-zag effect.

Interlining An insulation, padding, or stiffening fabric, either sewn to the wrong side of the lining or the inner side of the outer shell fabric. The interlining is used primarily to provide warmth in coats, jackets, and outerwear.

Jersey Knit Usually thinner or lighter-weight than Interlock knit with less stretch. It’s appropriate for tops and fuller dresses.

Khaki A tan or dusty colored warp face twill, softer and finer than drill. Name derived from East India word meaning “earth color.” Fabric made of cotton, linen, wool, worsted, or manmade fibers and blends.

Leather Animal skin dressed for use in clothing.

Matelassé A medium to heavyweight luxury fabric made in a double cloth construction to create a blistered or quilted surface. Common end-uses are upholstery, curtains, and evening dresses.

Netting Refers to any open-construction fabric whether it is created by weaving, knitting, knotting, or another method.

Organdy A stiffened, sheer, lightweight plain weave fabric, usually cotton or polyester.

Pincord A fabric similar in texture and appearance to corduroy with very fine raised stripes. Pincord fabric is most common in home décor and clothing projects.

Quatrefoil A fabric construction in which a layer of down or fiberfill is placed between two layers of fabric, and then held in place by stitching or sealing in a regular, consistent, all-over pattern on the goods.

Rip-Stop Nylon A lightweight, wind resistant, and water resistant fabric. Appropriate for outdoor wear and equipment as well as outdoor flags.

Sheer Any very light-weight fabric (e.g., chiffon, georgette, voile, sheer crepe). Usually has an open weave. Sheers mostly feel cool.

Tapestry A heavy, often hand-woven, ribbed fabric, featuring an elaborate design depicting a historical or current pictorial display. The weft-faced fabric design is made by using colored filling yarns, only in areas where needed, that are worked back and forth over spun warp yarns, which are visible on the back. End-uses include wall hangings and upholstery.

Ultrasuede An imitation suede fabric composed of polyester microfibers combined with polyurethane foam in a non-woven structure. Hand and appearance resemble sheep suede.

Velvet With a longer pile, velvet is the most luxurious fabric. Stretch velvet has some lycra, It can be machine washed and will not create a shine in the seat or elbows. Appropriate for tops, skirts and fuller trousers.

Waffle Cloth Similar to piqué in texture. Waffle cloth has a honeycomb weave made on dobby loom. Usually of cotton.

Yarn A continuous strand of textile fibers created when a cluster of individual fibers are twisted together. These long yarns are used to create fabrics, either by knitting or weaving.

Zephyr A thin kind of cashmere made in Belgium. The term also refers to a waterproof wool fabric.

Aaaand we made it!  Bet you didn’t think we could find a word for Q or Z did ya!